Movies, movies, movies

It’s Oscar season again.

I love the Oscars. I rearrange my schedule just to be home to watch the show, including the pre-shows.

When I lived in Australia, the time difference was such that I had to spend the day (Monday) in complete communication isolation. I didn’t want to find out anything before it was shown on TV later that night during primetime (many hours after the actual ceremony had ended). I wanted a surprise. I didn’t want any spoilers. It’s magic. It’s special. And I’m almost completely alone in this belief

In the weeks leading up to Oscars, I try to watch all the major films. This year is no exception. I still have a few to see but I also have a few days left.

Nevertheless, here’s my review of recently watched movies (in no particular order):

  • Precious – Good, somewhat disjointed story. Great acting. Interesting cinematography.  7/10
  • 500 Days of Summer – Good, funny, quirky; not a love story.  6.5/10
  • Men Who Stare at Goats – Hilariously funny; dry, black humor; major “suspend your disbelief” movie.  7.5/10
  • District 9 – Awful. Couldn’t even get to the end.  3/10
  • Inglorious Basterds – Really good…but then I love Tarantino.  8/10
  • The Proposal (Sandra Bullock & Ryan Reynolds) – Funny and touching but completely lacking in originality. Predictable. Outstanding moment – Ryan Reynolds naked with towel around waist.  4/10
  • The Blindside – good story, very engaging. Not sure Bullock’s acting is Oscar worthy but she does a good job playing a real person.
    THEN I read an Oscar preview blog and found out something’s that made me reconsider how much I enjoyed the movie upon first viewing.  7/10

Still to watch:

  • The Hurt Locker
  • Avatar
  • Up in the Air
  • A Single Man

Why bother

So I mentioned to a few folks that I started a blog and most asked “why?”

So I explained to them that this is a place to jote down my thoughts and ideas, sorta like a living diary.

That got me thinking about how technology has changed the way in which we record history…or in most cases how we don’t – at least not in the traditional sense. How will this generation (and the next) be regarded by history? Have we left enough behind so that future humans will have a true sense of what it was like to live in the 20th and 21st centuries?

Then I started thinking about TV & Movies. Will future generations think this is how we actually lived? How will they know the difference between what we call reality and what we call fiction. Haha…reality tv!